Tag Archives: tablet

Google Nexus 7vs iPad mini.

Apple iPad mini Google Nexus 7
Operating system iOS 6 Android 4.1
Price Wi-Fi: $329 (16GB), $429 (32GB), $529 (64GB). Cellular: $459 (16GB), $559 (32GB), $659 (64GB). $199 (16GB), $249 (32GB), $299 (32GB and HSPA+)
Release date November 2, 2012, for Wi-Fi; cellular 2 weeks later July 13, 2012
Display 7.9-inch IPS, 1,024×768 pixels (163 ppi) 7-inch IPS, 1,280×800 pixels (216 ppi)
Size 7.9 inches x 5.3 inches x 0.28 inch 7.8 inches x 4.7 inches x 0.41 inch
Weight 0.68 pound/308 grams (0.69 pound for cellular) 0.75 pound/340 grams
Processor Dual-core A5 processor Quad-core Nvidia Tegra 3
Memory 16GB, 32GB, or 64GB 8GB or 16GB; 1GB RAM
Camera 5-megapixel rear-facing, 1080p HD video; 1.2-megapixel front-facing camera, 720 HD video 1.2-megapixel front-facing
Battery “16.3-watt-hour”; 10 hours battery life (rated) 4,325mAh; 10.1 hours video battery life (tested)
NFC No Yes
Extras 4G LTE versions available Tegra games, HSPA+ version available
Ports Lightning connector Micro-USB
Color Black, white Black
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Google Nexus 7 The $200 Tablet.

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NEW YORK: In the 1982 sci-fi movie “Blade Runner,” there are hints that the hero, played by Harrison Ford, is an artificial human – an “android” or “replicant.” His job is to go out and kill other, rogue androids.
If he’s an android, he’s of the latest model, Nexus 7. That’s also the name Google has picked for the first tablet to bear the Google brand. Clearly, its mission is to go out and kill rogue tablets running Google’s Android software.
Specifically, the Nexus 7 seems to have been designed to give anyone who bought a Kindle Fire from Amazon.com or a Nook Tablet from Barnes & Noble a lethal case of buyer’s remorse.
The Nexus 7 costs $199, the same that Amazon and Barnes & Noble charge for their tablets. Google announced the tablet last week and is taking pre-orders for delivery in mid-July.
Why is Google targeting the Kindle Fire and the Nook Tablet? Because they’ve been relatively successful competitors to Apple’s iPad tablet, yet Google is getting no benefit from their success.
Google makes its Android operating software available for any device manufacturer to use.
Amazon and Barnes & Noble took Android and modified it heavily. Namely, they took out the applications that point to Google’s services and the advertising it sells. Instead, the apps point to the companies’ own stores.
In other words, these tablets are rogue Androids.
Other tablets, such as Samsung’s Galaxy, use the “proper,” Googlish version of Android, but they’ve been more expensive than the Kindle Fire and Nook Tablet. Apparently, Google thought it was time to make a really good, proper Android tablet for $199.
It’s succeeded. Nexus 7 is a really good value. It’s made by AsusTek Computer, a Taiwanese company that was originally planning to sell a similar tablet for $249.The Nexus 7 is a plain black slab with a screen that’s 7 inches on the diagonal – the same size as the Nook and the Fire. The most noticeable feature it has over the competition is a low-resolution camera, facing the user. That means the Nexus 7 can be used for videoconferencing, but it’s nearly impossible to use for snapshots. It also has a microphone, which the Fire lacks, making Amazon’s device useless even for audio
conferencing.The screen has a higher resolution than the Fire, and colors look more vivid. The whole tablet is slightly thinner and appreciably lighter than the Fire.
Other nifty but invisible hardware upgrades on the Nexus 7 include Bluetooth and GPS chips for use with headsets and navigation software. The tablet even has a chip for near-field communications, which means it can “talk” to some phones and store payment terminals when tapped against them.
But the most important difference between the Nexus 7 and its prey is the software. Not only is it running stock Android, but it’s also the first device to run the latest version of Android. Google, with its trademark combination of cute and cutthroat, calls it “Jelly Bean.”
Stock Android gives Nexus 7 access to a much wider array of applications than its competitors, running into the hundreds of thousands. The diversity also applies to content: You can use a wider range of e-book stores and movie services on the Nexus 7. You can read Kindle books on the Nexus 7, for example, but you can’t read Google books on the Kindle. Google does its best, though, to steer users to its “Play” store for apps, movies, music and books. Buyers even get a $25 credit toward store purchases, partly defraying the cost
of the tablet itself.
Original Post By THE TIMES OF INDIA.

Can Microsoft distinguish itself in the tablet market?

Despite Microsoft’s best efforts on Monday to demonstrate why Surface is different, it’s a crowded market out there.

All of the first-tier players like Samsung, Amazon, Sony, Lenovo, Acer, Asus, and Motorola (not to mention a Google-branded device that is expected) have already saturated the Android tablet market.

And then there’s the iPad, which is simply shorthand for tablet in a lot of consumers’ minds and commands most of the market. And has a two-year head start, to boot.

So, it’s a tall order for Microsoft and Windows 8.

surface tab

That said, the rollout of the 10.6-inch (16:9 widescreen HD) Surface tablets on Monday succeeded at the very least in showing that Microsoft has come up with a good idea.

The catch with tablets is the lack of a physical keyboard, which doesn’t appeal to some consumers. And keyboard docking solutions to date have typically not been very elegant, with a few exceptions.

Microsoft’s 3mm pressure sensitive cover doubles as a keyboard and trackpad and connects to Surface with a “single” magnetic click, according to Microsoft.

And price. It’s hard to win either way. Go low and you have to cut corners, strip out features. That ultimately gives the product a bad rap. Go high and, well, the problem is obvious.

Microsoft appears to be leaning toward the higher end of the market, with pricing rumored to start at $599 for RT (ARM chip-based) models. Intel-based versions with 1,920×1,080-pixel displays could run a lot higher. Information by CNET news.

The all new Surface Tab coming soon.

The touchscreen tablets are expected to go on sale later this year, and there’s no price tag in sight – but at first blush Surface looks elegant, exciting and expensive.

Both Surface tablets sport a 10.6-inch high-def display and come with a USB port and microSD card slot so you can easily add accessories and boost storage capacity beyond the base-grade 32GB.
The killer feature is a unique Touch Cover which protects the screen but flips forward to double as a keyboard (complete with a trackpad).

“We designed this organically, like a book” says Panos Panay, leader of Microsoft’s Surface team and point man for the product, which will instantly be tagged as Microsoft’s iPad killer.The Surface tablet also includes a slim stylus for note-taking using digital ink, which Microsoft promises will be as smooth as writing on a page.

When tilted back the cover becomes an integrated kickstand so that the Surface can be used in ‘desktop mode’, leaning up and towards the user.You’ll then be able to hook up a conventional keyboard and mouse over USB and fire up an external screen through the video port.

The tablet itself is cast from light but durable magnesium-alloy.

The thinnest of the two Surface tablets will run Windows RT – a special lightweight version of Windows 8 designed for the same low-power ARM chips which power most tablets and smartphones.Although Windows RT can’t run your usual desktop or laptop apps, Surface will come with its own version of Microsoft Office 2013, while other Windows RT apps for Surface will be available through the Microsoft’s online Windows Store.

The Surface for Windows RT tablet will weigh in at a mere 676 grams and stand wafer-thin at 9.3mm around the waist – almost identical to Apple’s third-generation iPad – and be offered with 32GB or 64GB of storage.